Housing report

New housing report examines how wealthy Louisville neighborhood can help city’s housing crisis

With a shortage of more than 50,000 affordable housing options in Louisville, a member of the Metro Board is offering solutions in his district with data to help in the fight. A new report from the Metropolitan Housing Coalition is the first to examine housing instability in families. Researchers studied District 8 neighborhoods like the Highlands and found that compared to the rest of Jefferson County, residents have more homeowners, fewer vacant properties, and a lower eviction filing rate. But, even with a large housing stock, data shows the district has issues, including older homes at risk of lead exposure and nearly 100 unhoused students from Jefferson County Public Schools in the region. “That’s one in 20 students.” The findings also underscore how the district is not using its rich resources for the greater good of Louisville’s housing crisis. “The large supply of short-term rentals could put a strain on our accommodation capacity, and most concerning is that we don’t have a single good choice of accommodation in use in the Highlands,” said the The report led to 29 policy recommendations for District 8 to reduce overall housing insecurity in the city, including: local and state agencies deploy federal housing resources Zoning changes to allow construction of ‘affordable rental units Using public properties for affordable housing Recruiting area landlords to participate in the housing choice program’ This is not a conversation we have enough of as a city, and today in my mind, that’s not the end of this conversation, it’s the beginning,” Chambers Armstrong said. “I hope people in the Highlands will read the report and say that it’s something I want to do something about. It shows that my neighbors are struggling and people all over town are struggling, what can I do to help? Regarding next steps, Chambers plans to meet with community stakeholders to discuss and implement the policies. Also, a lead prevention order she sponsored will be heard by the subway board next week. The full housing report is available here.

With a shortage of more than 50,000 affordable housing options in Louisville, a metro council member is offering solutions in his district with data to help in the fight.

A new report from the Metropolitan Housing Coalition is the first to examine housing instability in families.

Researchers studied District 8 neighborhoods like the Highlands and found that compared to the rest of Jefferson County, residents have more homeowners, fewer vacant properties, and a lower eviction filing rate.

But, even with a large housing stock, the data shows the district has issues, including older homes with lead exposure risks and nearly 100 unhoused students from Jefferson County Public Schools in the area.

“Highland Middle in my district is above the Jefferson County average with almost 5% homeless students, Chambers Armstrong said. “That’s one in 20 students.”

The findings also describe how the district is not using its rich resources for the greater good of Louisville’s housing crisis.

“The large supply of short-term rentals could put a strain on our accommodation capacity, and most concerning is that we don’t have a single good choice of accommodation in use in the Highlands,” said the advisor.

The report led to 29 policy recommendations for District 8 to reduce overall housing insecurity in the city, including:

  • Changes in how local and state agencies deploy federal housing resources
  • Zoning changes to allow construction of affordable rental units
  • Use of public property for affordable housing
  • Recruit local landlords to participate in the housing choice program

“It’s not a conversation we have enough of as a city, and today, in my mind, isn’t the end of that conversation, it’s the beginning,” Chambers Armstrong said. “I hope people in the Highlands will read the report and say this is something I want to do something about. It shows that my neighbors are in trouble and people all over town are in trouble, that then do I do to help?”

As for next steps, Chambers plans to meet with community stakeholders to discuss and implement the policies. Also, a lead prevention order she sponsored will be heard by the subway board next week.

The full housing report is available here.